Articles Tagged with alzheimer’s

p_pnznnd7-y-ashim-d-silva-300x200In July, Gary Lee Potts, 62, was arrested for his part in the 2014 death of Mauricio Edgar Cardenas, 65, who was an elderly nursing home resident with dementia at The Manse on Marsh. Potts, the owner of the facility, and another former facility administrator, Christopher E. Skiff, have been accused of elder and dependent abuse and involuntary manslaughter based on the care they and their facility failed to give to the elderly man.

If you believe your elderly loved one is not receiving the care he or she is entitled to at a nursing home, or you think that negligent care caused your relative’s death, contact our San Francisco elder neglect and abuse attorneys at Brod Law Firm right away. It can be difficult to investigate nursing home care. However, we are well-versed in these matters and will fight to get to the bottom of what has happened to your loved one.

Nursing Home Owner and Employee Charged With Manslaughter

zi8-e3qj_rm-cristian-newman-300x199Many of us have become familiar with dementia because we may have witnessed its effect first hand in a parent or grandparent. The condition, which is both chronic and progressive, affects about 47 million people worldwide. Millions of those individuals are right here in the U.S. and in California. Dementia affects all aspects of an individual’s life, from memory, the ability to think clearly, and the ability to live independently and perform everyday tasks. While many elderly people can initially live alone or with a spouse in the early stages of dementia, the disease usually progresses to the point of the individual requiring constant in-home care or to live in a nursing home. It is at this time that the elderly become vulnerable to abuse and neglect.

Rates of Dementia in the U.S.

As the Baby Boomer generation ages, many in the medical and public health professions worry that the rate of dementia will skyrocket. However, it looks like dementia rates in the U.S. are actually falling. A study by researchers at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, observed 21,000 U.S. adults over the age of 65 between 2000 and 2012. The study uncovered that the rate of dementia decreased 24% during this time period. It was 11.6% in 2000 and 8.8% in 2012. In 2000, the average age at diagnosis was 80.7 years and by 2012, the average age rose to 82.4 years.