Articles Tagged with child injury law firm in San Francisco

800px-Pine_Chest_of_Drawers_Handle-300x225A furniture warning and recall from IKEA has prompted many people to take steps to make their dressers safer. Dressers, and other large pieces of furniture pose a serious danger to young children. Children may climb on the furniture, causing it to fall onto them. IKEA furniture has injured or killed some children. Although any furniture is capable of falling, IKEA has taken steps to make their furniture less hazardous. As recently as this week, parents have reported toppling furniture that has fallen onto toddlers.

What Causes Furniture to Fall?

Dressers and similar pieces of furniture are naturally top heavy. While the drawers are closed there is generally no danger. However, when the drawers are open, it can cause the dresser to have more weight in the front, causing it to fall over. Young children have been found to open drawers in order to climb on the dressers. When a child opens a drawer and puts his weight on it, the dresser is unable to remain steady, and can topple forward, directly onto the child.

The family has gathered, the feast has been eaten, and the hosts are contemplating the inevitable leftovers.  Today is the unofficial kickoff to the holiday shopping season, although it seems like some stores have been holiday-ready for weeks!  As you begin to think about gifts for the youngest set, we urge you to consider the issues of toy safety.  Some of the hardest cases we see in our office involve children and our San Francisco, Oakland, and Santa Rosa toy injury lawyer wants children in Northern California and worldwide to enjoy a fun and safe holiday season.

WATCH Releases 2015 10 Worst Toys Listgifts2

World Against Toys Causing Harm,  a mouthful of a name that lends itself to the handy acronym “WATCH,” believes (as does our firm) that “One injury to one child as a result of a poorly designed or manufactured children’s product is one too many.”  Sadly, the group explains on its website, the toy industry makes some $70 billion worth of sales worldwide each year and with thousands of avoidable toy injuries occurring every year, WATCH believes that “safety often takes a back seat to earnings.”