Articles Tagged with falling furniture law firm

800px-Pine_Chest_of_Drawers_Handle-300x225A furniture warning and recall from IKEA has prompted many people to take steps to make their dressers safer. Dressers, and other large pieces of furniture pose a serious danger to young children. Children may climb on the furniture, causing it to fall onto them. IKEA furniture has injured or killed some children. Although any furniture is capable of falling, IKEA has taken steps to make their furniture less hazardous. As recently as this week, parents have reported toppling furniture that has fallen onto toddlers.

What Causes Furniture to Fall?

Dressers and similar pieces of furniture are naturally top heavy. While the drawers are closed there is generally no danger. However, when the drawers are open, it can cause the dresser to have more weight in the front, causing it to fall over. Young children have been found to open drawers in order to climb on the dressers. When a child opens a drawer and puts his weight on it, the dresser is unable to remain steady, and can topple forward, directly onto the child.

Being a parent is hard work.  There is no greater responsibility and no greater joy.  As the parents on our team know firsthand, most parents try their very best to keep our children safe.  Still, we are all too aware of the fact that tragedies happen.  Falling furniture remains a source of far too many child injuries and child deaths.  We can all help prevent tip-over accidents, but we should also be able to trust that the products we bring into our homes are reasonably safe.  When a dangerous product leaves a child injured or claims a child’s life, our San Francisco child injury law firm can help the family get recover compensation and help to prevent future tragedies from occurring.

IKEA Recalls Furniture Blamed for Six Child Deaths Due to Tip-Over Concerns

As reported this week by SFGate.com and the Associated Press, Ikea is recalling 29 million pieces of furniture in the wake of six reported child deaths linked to toppling units.  According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission (“CPSC”), all six deaths involved children aged three years or younger.  One of the deaths occurred some 27 years ago, but the other five occurred between 2002 and 2016.  Additionally, the CPSC reports it has received 36 reports on child injuries linked to the furniture.