Articles Tagged with bus accidents

annie-spratt-256172-unsplash-copy-300x200With over 4,000 large truck and bus accidents resulting in fatalities in the United States in 2016, it is clear that accidents can happen even on vehicles we typically deem to be safe. Whether you are traveling on a local bus, like a Muni bus, or a long haul bus, like a Greyhound, it is not always possible to avoid accidents and injuries. If you have been injured in a bus accident, make sure you know who is responsible and what your remedies are. Call an experienced personal injury attorney in your area to talk through your case and learn about your options moving forward.

Types of Buses in California

For most San Francisco natives, Muni and Greyhound are the two main types of buses used to get around. However, there are a variety of buses in the Bay Area that cater to other audiences, like tourists. Tour buses and school buses are just as prone to accidents as Muni or Greyhound buses and can be held liable in case of an accident that results in injury to its passengers.

daniel-monteiro-413416-copy-199x300In early February, an Alameda-Contra Costa (AC) Transit bus collided with a vehicle before striking a home in Berkeley. The bus, traveling west on Ashby Avenue, struck a red sedan driving south on California street. Both vehicles then careened into another parked vehicle and nearby home. The driver of the red sedan was killed in the crash. The bus driver and one passenger on the bus were not harmed. It is unclear what caused the accident and the Berkeley Police are investigating.

Why Bus Accidents Happen

Bus accidents are like any other type of car crash; they occur for many of the same reasons. One of the most common causes is bus driver error. Despite specific training, a bus driver can be careless or reckless behind the wheel, leading them to make dangerous mistakes. They could speed, tailgate, change lanes inappropriate, and make other reckless maneuvers. Drivers could be distracted by passengers on the bus, their cell phones, or a host of other things. Worse yet, a driver could work while impaired due to drugs or alcohol.

filippo-ascione-161021-copy-300x200Following a deadly charter bus accident in August 2016, Merced County district attorneys have brought multiple charges against the driver, Mario David Vasquez. A law enforcement investigation uncovered Vasquez was overly tired, talking on his cell phone, and violating multiple commercial regulations at the time of the crash, which led to four fatalities. Due to the evidence of Vasquez’s negligent actions while behind the wheel, he has been charged with four counts of vehicular manslaughter and five misdemeanor traffic violations.

While Vasquez faces criminal charges, he and his employer, Auto Buses Coordinados USA, could also face civil wrongful death suits based on his actions. If the families of those lost in the charter bus crash can prove the driver’s negligence, they may be able to obtain compensation for their losses.

California’s Wrongful Death Law

Tour_bus_in_ThailandNo two car crashes or highway collisions are the same, and no matter how many victims you help recover compensation through the civil courts, you can never be truly prepared for the carnage and tragedy of a crash like the one that happened this week on Interstate 10. There, a tour bus returning from a casino slammed into the back of a slow-moving tractor-trailer truck. The truck was believed to have been traveling at five miles per hour because of utility work that was going on; the bus is believed to have been traveling over 60 miles per hour when it struck the trailer. The crash killed 13 individuals and injured another 31, making it one of the deadliest car crashes in state history.

“No Evidence the Driver Applied the Brakes”

According to a Fox News report, the California Highway Patrol concluded that there was no evidence the driver of the tour bus applied the brakes to the bus before striking the tractor-trailer. In order to make this conclusion in this or any other car crash case, investigators usually look at two pieces of evidence: