Articles Tagged with San Francisco car accident injury law firm

IIHS_Hyundai_Tucson_crash_testVehicles continue to become safer to drive. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, Highway Loss Data Institute, IIHS HLDI, released its annual report on vehicle safety. The report ranks new vehicles on their overall safety, providing ratings that help consumers purchase vehicles. The ratings are made using a variety of data.

Crashworthiness Tests

In order to qualify for a top safety pick, a vehicle needs to get good ratings in five crashworthiness tests. The tests are used to evaluate structural design and restraints. The tests ensure good structure, which includes a strong compartment for occupants, crumple zones to absorb impact, side structure to protect the compartment, and a roof that will survive a rollover accident. Seat belts and airbags are also tested. These types of tests are performed:

Car crashes can have many terrible consequences that may impact automobile occupants and bystanders alike.  One consequence that many people don’t think about is the link between car crashes and gas leaks.  Gas leaks can be silent killers, poisoning the air and creating the risk of horrific explosions.  As a San Francisco gas leak injury lawyer, Attorney Brod knows these incidents are far more common than people might imagine.  He and his team believe in helping the injured and/or mourning by holding the responsible parties accountable for the consequences of their actions.  We bring personal injury suits and/or wrongful death claims in Northern California in cases of car accidents, gas leaks, and cases that involve a dangerous combination of both.

Auto Accidents Causing Gas Leaks: Far Too Common, Far Too Dangerous

CBS SF reports that fire crews were called to the 2200 block of Story Road in East San Jose on Sunday due to reports of a gas leak.  Accordgaslineing to San Jose Fire Department Capt. Brad Cloutier, the leak was the result of a motor vehicle crash.  Officials evacuated numerous buildings and homes located on Story Road and Amador Drive.

yellowlineDriving can be a frustrating task.  One of the scenarios most likely to cause frustration is being stuck behind a slow-moving vehicle, especially one travelling well below the marked speed limit.  Knowing how to safely pass another vehicle is an important part of any safe driver’s repertoire.  Sadly, far too often improper passing leads to serious injuries or death.  As your Oakland car accident injury attorney, Greg Brod can help if you are a loved one are injured in Northern California by someone else’s dangerous passing attempt.

Police Eye Passing Attempt in Deadly Northern California Car Crash

Police are eyeing a passing attempt as the cause of a deadly car accident near Rio Vista, according to a report by CBS SF.  CHP officials say that a Honda Civic was attempting to pass another vehicle when the driver lost control of the car, veering back into the passing lane and colliding with an oncoming Chevy Silverado.  The Silverado’s four occupants were taken to the hospital but are not believed to have serious injuries.  Unfortunately, five people who were in the Civic died as a result of the crash.  The deceased include a teenager and two three-year-old children.  Police report that all of the people in the pick-up were wearing seatbelts, but they are unsure if the Civic’s occupants were buckled in and they only found one car seat inside the vehicle.  It is unclear whether recent wet weather was a factor in the crash.

It has been an unusually rainy couple of weeks here in the Bay Area. According to SFGate.com, the rain is likely to continue this weekend and all next week with the forecast including a soggy Christmas Day.  While we all know that we need the rain, that doesn’t make it easy to get through a long stretch of wet weather.  The frequent rains also make for difficult driving and, because prevention is always the best option, our San Francisco car accident law firm wants people to stay alert for the possibility of hydroplaning and related accidents.

Parents Killed, Young Children Injured, Police Suspect Vehicle Hydroplaned

For at least one family, the threat of a wet weather accident became all too real recently. NBC Bay Area reports that an accident on eastbound Interstate 580 near West Grant Line Road claimed two lives on Sunday December 13.  Officials suspect that the single-car accident, which occurred in the vicinity of the Altamont Pass, began when the vehicle hydroplaned on a pool of water.  The vehicle then rolled repeatedly before coming to a stop down an embankment.  The two adults in the car were pronounced dead at the scene while their children, ages 5 and 6, were taken to an area hospital with one reportedly suffering traumatic injuries.

As your San Francisco personal injury law firm, we fight for compensation for the injured and we know our client’s need money to move forward after tragedy.  To put it bluntly, money helps.  Still, we understand that no amount of money can take away the pain of an injury or the grief of a loved one’s death.  This is why we believe in prevention first.  While many entries on this blog include cautionary tales and evidence-backed advice that we hope will further support our commitment to safety, this post will focus on hope and the ambitious prevention goals embodied in the Vision Zero SF plan.


What Is Vision Zero SF?

Vision Zero SF is a road safety policy and a commitment to protect our city’s residents and visitors by making the streets safe and livable.  According to the program’s website, 30 people die and more than 200 are seriously injured each year as they travel the city’s streets.  The Vison Zero program, which originated in Sweden and is spreading to U.S. cities, is based on the belief that these numbers are unacceptable and these accidents preventable.  San Francisco adopted the policy in 2014.  The collaborative effort involves policy changes and cultural shifts with the lofty but firm goal of eliminating all traffic deaths by 2024.  The initial Two-Year Action Plan calls for completing at least 24 traffic safety improvements in the first 24 months