Articles Posted in Motorcycle Accidents

igor-ovsyannykov-219657-copy-300x200A motorcycle driver passed away Monday, June 12 after colliding with a barrier on U.S. Highway 101 in San Francisco. The accident happened around noon near the Ninth Street off ramp after the rider failed to maneuver through a curve on the road, leading to her immediate death. It also blocked off multiple lanes of the highway for appropriately two hours.

This tragic accident highlights the need for caution and a focus on road safety for both motorcyclists and other drivers. Individuals injured in multi-vehicle or motorcycle accidents may have to seek compensation through personal injury claims. For those who lose loved ones in motorcycle crashes, wrongful death claims may be appropriate and necessary. To learn more about your rights after a motorcycle crash, contact the San Francisco personal injury attorneys of Brod Law Firm right away.

Motorcycle Accident Statistics

Norton_MotorcycleTraveling by motorcycle is a fun, economical way to get where you need to go. Unfortunately, motorcycle accidents are not uncommon. When a crash with a motorcycle occurs, the rider is often seriously injured, or even killed. The number of motorcycle deaths increased in California in 2014, even though the total number of traffic fatalities decreased overall.

Motorcycle Accident Statistics

Motorcycle fatalities in California increased by about 12% in 2014 over 2013. This is according to statistics kept by the California Office of Traffic Safety, or OTS. In 2013 there were 463 motorcycle fatalities, while in 2014 that number increased to 519 deaths. Motorcycle deaths per 100,000 registered operators were 54 in 2013. This number increased to 60 in 2014.

motorcycleCWhether it is the feeling of the wind passing by, the improved gas mileage and ease of commuting, or the camaraderie among riders, motorcyclists are passionate about life on two wheels.  From teen motorcycle riders to riders in their senior years, the Brod Law Firm supports the right of motorcycle riders of all ages to enjoy their passion and be safe while doing so.  We also know that drivers must work to protect the safety of everyone on the road, no matter how many wheels on their vehicle of choice.  Our Sonoma motorcycle injury lawyer is honored to advocate on behalf of motorcycle riders injured or killed by negligent drivers in Northern California.

Teens Injured in Northern California Motorcycle Crash

The families of two teens know all too well the damage a driver can do to a motorcycle in a crash.  On Sunday, according to a report in the Press Democrat, two 15-year-old boys were injured in a motorcycle crash in Clearlake.  Police believe that a man in a pickup truck followed behind a car as it crossed a double yellow line and attempted to pass the motorcycle carrying the teens.  When the motorcycle attempted to turn left onto 33rd Avenue, the truck slammed into the bike and both boys were thrown off the motorcycle.  The motorcycle passenger incurred major injuries and was taken to a hospital via helicopter.  The motorcycle’s driver suffered moderate injuries and was taken to St. Helena Hospital for treatment.

Most drivers have seen the bumper stickers that read: “Look Twice Save a Life – Motorcycles Are Everywhere.”  Tragically, many drivers fail to heed this warning.  Motorcycle accidents and motorcycle fatalities are far too common and often a careless or inattentive driver is to blame.  As an Oakland motorcycle accident attorney, Greg Brod advocates for riders and families whose lives are forever altered because of a driver’s negligence.

Two Motorcycle Rider Killed in Highway 113 Crash

CBS SF reports that two motorcycle riders died after a crash on Highway 113 near Dixon this past Saturday.  At around 6:48 PM, California Highway Patrol officers were called to the scene of an accident near Hay Road in unincorporated Solano County.  Police believe that a 36-year-old woman was making a left turn in a 2010 Dodge Charger and failed to yield the right of way to two oncoming motorcyclists.  The riders, who were travelling at around 55mph on separate motorcycles, crashed into the car and both were ejected from their bikes.

Every year, the National Transportation Safety Board (“NTSB”) releases what it calls its “Most Wanted List.”  This list represents the NTSB’s top advocacy priorities for the year, improvements to safety that the NTSB believes can make the biggest difference in preventing transportation accidents and saving lives.  Our San Francisco injury law firm shares the NTSB’s commitment to transportation safety and, while we advocate for injury victims in California every day, we know that prevention is always the best goal.

The following items are on the NTSB’s 2016 Most Wanted List:

  • Reduce Fatigue-Related Accidents: It is impossible to know exactly how many car accidents are due to drowsy driving, but the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration believes anywhere from 2% to 20% of yearly traffic fatalities are due to drowsy drivers.  The problem also extends to other areas of the transportation field and the NTSB identified fatigue as a probable cause in 20% of the Board’s 182 major investigations between 2001 and 2012.

At The Brod Law Firm, we are proud to work with motorcycle riders who’ve been injured by negligent drivers and we have long supported the motorcycle riding community.  However, ultimately our job is to help the wrongfully injured or those grieving the wrongfully killed.  While it is less common than pedestrian accidents caused by cars, pedestrian accidents caused by motorcycles are a threat.  When a negligent motorcycle rider harms a pedestrian, our San Francisco pedestrian accident attorney is, as always, prepared to fight for the wrongfully injured.  We know that most riders are as committed to safety as they are to the open road and suspect they’d support our efforts to help the victims of motorcycle riders who failed to appreciate the power two wheels can have.

Weekend San Francisco Motorcycle Crash Leaves Pedestrian Dead

Over the weekend, the San Francisco Chronicle reported on the arrest of a motorcycle rider on hit-and-run charges.  A police spokesman told reporters that a 67-year-old woman had been crossing 24th Street mid-block in the vicinity of Noriega Street shortly before 7 PM on Friday when a motorcyclist passed around a double-parked vehicle and hit the pedestrian.  The woman was transported to San Francisco General Hospital where she was pronounced dead.

In many ways, injury law comes down to a question of cause and effect.  Our San Francisco motorcycle accident attorney and his support team work diligently to determine (and prove) what caused the accident, the question of fault, and what has and will happen as a result, the question of damages.  The “effect” inquiry looks at both today and tomorrow, an especially complex inquiry in the case of the serious injuries or loss of life that are far too common in motorcycle accidents.  That is, however, a question for another day.  Today, we discusses the “cause” inquiry, the question of what happened in the moments before the crash, looking at a recent tragedy in San Ramon and the leading research on the cause of motorcycle accidents.  Ultimately, the cause and effect inquiries may be complex but our team is well-equipped to uncover the truth in order to help injured riders and grieving loved ones recover compensation for their losses.

Multi-Part San Ramon Accident Leaves Motorcycle Rider Dead

A multi-vehicle accident led to the death of a motorcycle rider in San Ramon on Monday.  CBS San Francisco reports that the crash occurred around 4:40 A.M. on Highway 680 South just past Bollinger Canyon Road.  The incident began when a Honda rear-ended a big-rig truck and the impact caused the Honda to spin before coming to a halt in the middle of lane three.  A motorcycle then struck the disabled vehicle and the 39-year-old rider was ejected.  Moments later, another big-rig truck hit both the motorcycle and the rider before catching aflame.  The motorcycle rider was pronounced dead at the scene.  CBS’s article does not note the status of any of the other individuals involved in the complex accident.

Cars are powerful machines, a fact that is easy to forget as we go about our day-to-day lives.  Occasionally, however, we are given a sharp reminder.  In some cases, this comes in the form of a close call; a driver glances down momentarily, perhaps returning a beverage to the cup holder, and looks up to with just enough time to motorcycleBbrake before hitting someone crossing the road.  Such moments make us think about what could have happened and remember how much responsibility we have behind the wheel.  Unfortunately, sometimes the reminder takes a harsher form and someone is hurt or even killed.  These moments remind us of the sheer power of the automobile, the importance of attentive driving, and the vulnerability of other travelers, especially those not protected by an automobile themselves.  As the following story of two crashes illustrates, pedestrian injuries and motorcyclist injuries are far too real and, in the opinion of our San Francisco injury law firm, far too common.

Pedestrian and Motorcycle Rider Hit in Two Crashes

A motorcycle officer and a pedestrian were injured in a pair of accidents on Tuesday.  The San Francisco Chronicle reports that a police officer aboard a motorcycle was struck by a car around 7:30 A.M. at the intersection of Leavenworth Street and Golden Gate Avenue.  A police spokesman told reporters the officer was in the far-left lane when a Volvo travelling in the same direction changed lanes, hitting the officer and sending him crashing into a nearby parked car.  The officer was injured but is expected to recover.  The driver is cooperating with investigators.

Motorcycle riders are passionate about their love for two wheels.  Some cite the power and beauty of the machines themselves, some cite riding as a lower cost alternative to driving, others like feeling in touch with the road and the world around them.  For most, it is probably all the above.  Motorcycle riders deserve to be safe, but motorcycle fatalities and serious rider injuries are far too common.  Our Oakland motorcycle injury law firm is committed to advocating for riders and their loved ones when motorcycle crashes are caused by negligent, inattentive drivers.

Motorcycle Rider Killed in Hit-and-Run

Over the weekend, as KTVU reports, a motorcycle rider died in a hit-and-run collision on interstate Highway 880 in Milpitas.  The rider has been identified as 29 year-old Maka Langi of East Palo Alto.  At approximately 9:15 P.M. on Saturday, callers alerted California Highway Patrol officers to a motorcyclist down.  A passing motorist pulled the wrecked cycle off the road.  Milpitas fire crews were the first on scene but they were too late to help Langi.

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The brunt of a crash between a truck and smaller motor vehicle almost invariably falls most heavily on the latter, with the odds of survival or escaping injury for the motorist much poorer than those for the trucker. However, a collision between a truck and a motorcyclist, bicyclist or pedestrian is even more heavily stacked against the nontrucking party, with the chances for a fatal encounter for the latter greatly increased. And San Francisco motorcycle accident and trucking accident attorney Gregory J. Brod notes with sadness that a hit-and-run collision between a truck and motorcycle in Fremont on Wednesday left the motorcyclist dead and the truck driver nowhere to be found.

According to KTVU News, a 61-year-old man riding his motorcycle eastbound toward Warm Springs Boulevard on Mission Boulevard, which is a busy road that connects Interstates 880 and 680, was struck and killed by a semi-rig at about 1:15 p.m. Wednesday. Witnesses reported that the driver of the truck, which may have been towing two chrome-colored tanks, continued on without stopping after hitting the 2004 Kawasaki motorcycle.

The California Highway Patrol has identified the deceased motorcyclist but was not releasing his name until his family is notified. The CHP said that it is possible the trucker did not realize that he or she had struck the motorcycle, and that the collision occurred on a stretch of the road that is under construction, which elevated the hazardous conditions on the busy street.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration‘s most recent statistics paint a grim picture for motorcyclists involved in crashes, including the following:

  • In 2012, 4,957 motorcyclists were killed in motor vehicle traffic crashes, which represents a 7 percent increase from the 4,630 motorcyclists who were killed in 2011.
  • In 2012, there were 93,000 motorcyclists who were injured, which is a 15 percent increase from the 81,000 who were injured in 2011.
  • In 2012, motorcyclists accounted for 15 percent of all traffic fatalities and 18 percent of all occupant (driver and passenger) fatalities.
  • While motorcycles represented only 3 percent of all registered vehicles in the United States in 2012 and accounted for only 0.07 percent of all vehicle miles traveled, on a per-vehicle-mile-traveled basis, they were 26 times more likely than passenger car occupants to die in traffic crashes and five times more likely to be injured
  • On a per-registered-vehicle basis, the fatality rate for motorcyclists was six times the rate for passenger car occupants in 2012, while the injury rates for motorcyclists and passenger car occupants were about the same.
  • In 2012, 2,624, or 52 percent, of all motorcycles involved in fatal crashes collided with another motor vehicle.

In addition, the NHTSA‘s most recent statistics on trucking crashes sketch an ominous picture for motor vehicles that are unfortunate enough to be involved in a collision with a truck, including the following:

  • In 2012, 3,921 people died and another 104,000 were injured in crashes involving large trucks – those with a gross vehicle weight rating greater than 10,000 pounds – 333,000 of which were involved in traffic crashes that year.
  • The 3,921 fatalities from crashes involving large trucks in 2012 represented a 4 percent increase from the 3,781 who died the year before.
  • Of the trucking-linked fatalities in 2012, 73 percent were occupants of other vehicles, 10 percent were non-occupants, and only 18 percent were occupants of large trucks.
  • In 2012, 104,000 people were injured in crashes involving large trucks, which represents an 18 percent increase from the 88,000 who were injured in 2011.
  • Of the trucking-linked injuries in 2012, 73 percent were occupants of other vehicles, 3 percent were non-occupants, and only 24 percent were occupants of large trucks.
  • In 2012, large trucks accounted for 4 percent of all registered vehicles, 9 percent of the total vehicle miles traveled, and 8 percent of all vehicles involved in fatal crashes.

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